C2C Snapshots

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Leadership & Character | Winston-Salem, NC

Group 2 photo from the C2C in Alumni Hall on April 3, 2019

A group of Wake Foresters gathered over dinner in Alumni Hall on the Reynolda Campus on April 3, 2019 to discuss Leadership & Character.

Overview and highlights of our Call to Conversation:

  • Many of us shared stories of family members who have served as strong examples of character–parents interacting & connecting with those in our community who are different from us; grandfathers displaying incredible humility amidst great success and giving their blood (quite literally), sweat, and tears to help others; and a mother showing great love and focusing on others even through her own trials.
  • We raised a few questions: How do you export character? Should we? Is character relative and unique to our own experiences? Is it accurate to talk about character as though it is synonymous with morals and values?
  • Through our conversation, we came to some great conclusions: that change is incremental and an individual or personal relationship often influences character the most.
  • Lastly, character is exemplified through:
    • Sacrifice
    • Leading by example
    • Doing the right thing even when no one is watching (or, you never know who might be watching and be changed by your actions)
    • Being a good neighbor by looking out for each other

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Leadership & Character | Winston-Salem, NC

Group 1 photo from the C2C in Alumni Hall on April 3

A group of Wake Foresters gathered over dinner in Alumni Hall on the Reynolda Campus on April 3, 2019 to discuss Leadership & Character.

Overview and highlights of our Call to Conversation:

  • We began our conversation sharing times we had seen character in action. Many of our experiences included examples of authenticity, patience, and compassion for one’s neighbors.
  • Our discussion then turned to whether or not character can be taught. We agreed that character can be taught but not necessarily in the classroom setting. Instead character is learned by persevering through difficult situations, such as death and suffering.
  • The theme of death carried over to a discussion on eulogy virtues and how we can focus on these instead of “resume” virtues.

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Leadership & Character | Winston-Salem, NC

A group of Wake Foresters gathered over dinner in Alumni Hall on the Reynolda Campus on April 3, 2019 to discuss Leadership & Character.

Overview and highlights of our Call to Conversation:

  • We discussed character in action through our own lived experience. Some of us used specific people and events for our examples, others used broader examples of character revelation over the lifetime of a particular person or a series of events.
  • Character is revealed through servant leaders; in its truest sense, character is exhibited when no one is looking; character has taken a back seat in our culture; and now, especially, we need good role models of character.
  • We talked about the campus community and asked ourselves, “How do teachers become positive role models” when “WFU can be a bubble”?
  • A few takeaways participants mentioned were: “Recognize character in the little things”, “small things make us”, “we cannot change the world, but if we change one life, the world changes.”

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Leadership & Character | Bristol, TN

Group photo from the C2C in Bristol, TN on April 2, 2019

A group of Wake Foresters gathered over dinner in Bristol, TN on April 2, 2019 to discuss Leadership & Character.

Overview and Highlights of our Call to Conversation:

  • Wonderful examples were shared of people in our lives who have exemplified character, including colleagues, teachers, family members, and friends. It was evident that we each were stirred by both the stories we heard and those we ourselves shared. It was an enriching experience. Below are some of the themes which seemed especially evident across all our stories:
    • We never know how what we do today will influence others.
    • It is our responsibility to cultivate the good in others. Acknowledging others’ positive character traits reinforces positive behavior.
    • Character is often evidenced in: the “little things”; individual resilience; putting others first; and doing for others without desiring or expecting notoriety.
    • Each of those we spoke about were genuine, intentional in how they reached out to us, and present in our lives. We acknowledged that as they lived, so should we.
    • We concurred that no matter our differences – politically or otherwise – we should begin discussions on the premise that we all have the same desire for civility and respect. Then, from this common ground, strive to find the middle ground.
    • Some of us are still pondering David Brooks’ op-ed that shared about the differences between our “resumé” virtues and our “eulogy” virtues. This, we recognized, is the great irony of our culture today in defining success. One among us beautifully encapsulated their takeaway of the evening: that it’s so important to be intentional about developing our “eulogy” virtues.

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Wellbeing | Bridgewater, VA

Group photo from the C2C in Bridgewater, VA on April 2, 2019

A group of Wake Foresters gathered over dinner in Bridgewater, VA on April 2, 2019 to discuss Wellbeing.

Overview and highlights of our Call to Conversation:

  • Our discussion on wellbeing focused on several habits and /or factors, such as intentional relationships and connections, prioritizing these relationships, making a commitment to work-life balance, having boundaries and holding to them, and commitment to joy and gratitude
  • We also acknowledged that wellbeing is something to work towards, but not always easy to achieve, and it’s important to show grace when we aren’t successful at it, without blaming ourselves or expecting perfection of ourselves
  • We discussed how we can help the next generation in living lives of wellbeing, including understanding that social media can be a detriment to this (the perfection you see online is not the reality), helping them understand that everyone is broken by sharing our own experiences of failure or imperfection, and helping teach resiliency.
  • And finally, we discussed the insight that in many cases, a focus on wellbeing is for the privileged – that many people have to worry about basic daily needs and survival. Self care often takes time and money that many do not have.

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